Paired-end amplicon sequencing uncovers new understanding of animal symbiosis.

Paired-end amplicon sequencing uncovers new understanding of animal symbiosis.

Kim Dill-McFarland, PhD, University of Wisconsin
Topic: Microbiology & Infectious Disease : Customer

Herbivores rely on symbiotic microbial communities to convert indigestible plant materials into accessible nutrients. Sloths are thought to be especially dependent on this symbiosis, as their mostly leaf-based diet severely limits their nutrient intake. They also engage in a complex symbiotic relationship with pyralid moths. Join us for a live webinar event to learn how Kim Dill-McFarland and her team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison used paired-end 16S amplicon sequencing on the MiSeq® System to explore the sloth's
microbe-cycling hypothesis.



28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) 2018
Madrid, Spain | Europe
Topic: Microbiology & Infectious Disease